Butchering the Classics

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AssistantCrone
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Butchering the Classics

Post by AssistantCrone » Sun Feb 18, 2007 10:51 pm

http://www.nocloo.com/gallery2/main.php ... &g2_page=4

I stumbled upon this gallery while looking for that Heath Robinson drawing with the tortoises. Er. There's a huge collection on this site of 'golden age' illustrations, and I love this gallery in particular for the texture and colours and the fact that half of the pictures are set just after the sun goes down and everything's light blue. (Dusk, Beb).

So, I had a go at something as similar as I could manage. After hearing a whispered rumour at the Temple of Nuclear Power, an intrepid young *cough* man climbs a hill, which he never would have done otherwise, and turns to gaze upon the Doughnut Tree. Don't ask. I'm not in charge of these things.

The hardest thing about the colouring, even more so than trying to get the colours right, was doing a watercolour wash effect. Still, it was a lot of fun to do, and I thought I'd better post it before I started going nuts over the details. Many, many thanks to Morpheus and everyone who helped me with Homer. Apologies to Edmund Dulac.

EDIT: And his pupils grew larger in astonishment.
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Last edited by AssistantCrone on Mon Feb 19, 2007 6:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Now, I know art is all about expressing ourselves, but today we're going to express ourselves by getting it right." --DB
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gkscotty
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Re: Butchering the Classics

Post by gkscotty » Sun Feb 18, 2007 11:11 pm

*falls to pieces*

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Re: Butchering the Classics

Post by Terry Y » Mon Feb 19, 2007 12:50 am

I loves it.  ;D
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Re: Butchering the Classics

Post by c_nordlander » Mon Feb 19, 2007 9:22 am

I'll try to keep this review as concise and non-gushy as possible.

If you hadn't told me you did this on a computer, I couldn't have guessed. The watercolour effects are what makes this work shine, obviously, and shine it does. The colours are *perfect*. (It's not too green!) Plenty of lighter pastel spots to lighten the darkness of the background. In fact, in love as I am with the colouring, I think I adore the lines even more. They seem almost etched. While I haven't looked at that many of Dulac's paintings, the pastiche is obvious, but I can see your hand in it as well.

Homer is on-model, of course. (His stomach seems just slightly lower than usual, but that could be the effect of the Turkish garb.) This is one of his most charming expressions. The tree is indeed appetising. And I like the cooling towers on the horizon. I always do.

What is there not to like? This is the kind of painting I want to stroke and taste. I notice a bit of a moiré pattern, particularly in the sky to the right. Is that intentional? Not that it really matters.

Simply awesome.
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Re: Butchering the Classics

Post by Morpheus306 » Mon Feb 19, 2007 9:33 am

A Spy in Mancunia wrote: Homer is on-model, of course.
Actually, he is way off model.  But this turned out great.  His pupils are sooooo small, you can barely see them.  Looking at the originals from where you got inspiration, I would have made the tree a lot bigger and more abundant.  It just seems kinda bare and withered, the prints had a lot of contrast with the subjects.  A large donut tree next to a small homer would have made this really shine.  But the colors are beautiful
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Re: Butchering the Classics

Post by Casper » Mon Feb 19, 2007 1:19 pm

Wow, I love the sky effect, the reflection of colours through the cloud and the just visible stars.
You've duplicated Edmund's work rather nicely, the colours are a more 'drab' which gives it a dream feel, much like Dulac's.
I think the small tree gives it a sence of rareity, like its a very uncommon thing for any being to find. With this in mind, Homers gaze of almost drooling suprise and excitment is very well thought out.
I love the desolated background too. In fact, I think I love the whole picture! :D
A truely wonderful work of art Beb :)
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Re: Butchering the Classics

Post by AssistantCrone » Mon Feb 19, 2007 6:06 pm

Thanks everyone!  :)

Morpheus, thanks for the crit re: model and composition. I guessed that the pupils were too small (now corrected, maybe), but otherwise I was concentrating too much on colour and texture. As for the rest of Homer; well, hopefully I’m learning.

Now, about the tree. Again, I should have posted what the hell I was thinking of *before* I posted the picture. It’s true that the trees in Dulac’s series, while not enormous, extend right off the page, but if it’s any justification the doughnut tree was meant to be small, bare and withered. Few know that it grows only from sprinkles, which few doughnuts are blessed with. The sprinkled doughnuts are particularly prized as food: this led to the extermination of the doughnut tree except in barren out-of-the-way places, where it grows still, but not very well.

Admittedly I should have drawn a larger/taller/more dynamic withered tree, but it didn't suit the story I was quite happily babbling to myself as I played about with texture brushes. But again, thanks for the comments and criticism. I’d pay you in doughnuts but someone ate my tree.
"Now, I know art is all about expressing ourselves, but today we're going to express ourselves by getting it right." --DB
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Re: Butchering the Classics

Post by fellranger » Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:49 pm

I was wondering how this would turn out and it certainly doesn't disappoint.  You've really nailed the feel of the Dulac pics, as Chris said, you wouldn't guess it was digital.  I'm with Casper on the tree size, it does make it seem more rare and fragile, which fits your story.  I like the uncluttered feel of the picture, with just a few rocks to add detail.  The donut "buds" are a nice touch, as is the hint at Homer's usual white shirt and those cooling towers in the background.
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Re: Butchering the Classics

Post by KANG » Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:56 pm

Oh wow, I admire you!


Just can do...

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Really great work, nothing to say.
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Re: Butchering the Classics

Post by OARRIAGA2001 » Sat Feb 24, 2007 9:38 pm

Doughnuts  grow on trees now.  Great! There isn't anything much too add besides what's been told.    This is a style I haven't seen before on simpsons art. You are quite a cameleon when it comes to art -- every little piece of yours is an experiment with new medium.
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Re: Butchering the Classics

Post by Sheana_Molloy » Sun Mar 11, 2007 5:15 am

How'd I miss this one??

That is a fantabulous picture, Beb!  I love the colors and details and everything.  ;D
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